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Note: this website is an archived repository for a course taught from January - April in 2016.

Welcome to University Writing 30:151

Welcome to the website for University Writing 30:151. I've built this simple resource to help students get started with the course and stay organized throughout the semester. It is the easiest way to check deadlines, access readings and slides, and stay informed about changes to the course schedule. You can also find links to other tools and resources that we'll use throughout the semester. 

If you're a student in UW 30:151, I recommend getting familiar with the website so you can quickly find things as you need them. You can follow the links below or use the menu to browse around and familiarize yourself with this resource. 

SYLLABUS  - The syllabus describes and outlines the course. It includes assignment weights, guidelines, and deadlines. Other important dates, such as tests and workshops, can be found here. 

SKILLS  - This handout summarizes the main skills that you will develop throughout the course. Use this summary to gauge your progress throughout the semester. You should also consult the skills summary to strengthen your writing process for each assigned essay. How well you demonstrate these skills will determine your grade. 

SCHEDULE  - This part of the website outlines the topics and readings we will discuss on the scheduled dates. You must complete the pre-class reading before attending each lecture. Each "event" is a class in which we will cover topics that are previewed in the event description. 

ASSIGNMENTS  - A resource to find assignment instructions and guidelines. Assignment instructions are published to Google Drive and can be accessed at any time; however, I may make changes to the instruction doc before I distribute it in class. These instructions are usually distributed a month before the deadline, so use this time wisely to produce your best work. 

SLIDES  - All of the slides I use in class are published to my profile on slides.com. They are organized by date. Keep in mind that the slides are not substitutes for the lectures. I use them as a visual and structural aid, not as a place to dump information, so they are skeletal by design. 

The other items in the menu are self-explanatory, except perhaps SlackSlack is a group communication tool for discussing course content and whatever else comes up. Please contact me via email if you haven't received an invite. Only students who are officially registered in the course at Brandon University can access our Slack team. 

GitHub

On each page of this course hub you'll notice a link in the menu labelled "Edit this page on GitHub."

This website is synced with a GitHub repository to allow for an open, collaborative platform that encourages students and other collaborators to copy or suggest changes to the content.

Each page is stored as a separate text file in the repository. This enables ease of updating and collaborative editing through GitHub. If you have a resource to suggest for one of the topics, feel free to add it yourself! I'm not an expert in Git, but if you would like some help getting setup on GitHub, let me know and I'll see whether I can give you some direction.

Thanks for your interest in this course and feel free to ask questions on Slack. Don't forget to introduce yourself once I've sent you an invite.